Category Archives: Microsoft Exchange Server 2010

How to make images display correctly in email signatures (not as attachments)

Displaying images as attachments is a common problem. The solution is not so obvious, because there can be many reasons for that. The problem may occur if the message gets converted to the plain text format or if there are issues with the HTML code of an email signature. Finally, it can be caused by a specific Outlook configuration. In this article, I will show you how to make sure images are not displayed as attachments in each of those situations.

Make sure the email format is set to HTML

The most common reason for images displaying as attachments is that some messages are sent in the plain text format instead of the HTML format. As the plain text format does not support embedding or viewing images, all images are automatically attached to the message. Continue reading

13 good email disclaimer examples

Email disclaimers have been around for a long time, and for a good reason. Despite the ongoing discussion on their legal effectiveness and enforceability, legal teams insist on inserting them into emails. Disclaimers inform recipients about what they can and cannot do with the emails sent from your company. A humble request to inform the sender in case the message was intended for someone else will usually work. Thanks to that, you could e.g. learn that something is wrong in your newsletter subscription list or even save a deal after simply misspelling your client’s email address.

13 best samples of email disclaimers - email disclaimer examples

If you have a task to create an email disclaimer or signature for your company and your mind went blank, fear not. We are here to provide inspiration.

First of all, do not forget to insert your company’s data into the disclaimer. This serves more than one purpose. First of all, providing information on your company is required by law in some countries. For more information on legal requirements for email disclaimers, please consult this article. Apart from the legal aspect, there is also a high marketing value. Including your company’s name and other information in every email makes your brand more and more recognizable and reinforces the bond between you and the client.

In this article, you can find text content for your disclaimers. If you want to give them a nice graphic design and combine with a good looking email signature, you can consult the article on professional email signature designs. Here, provided email disclaimers examples are divided into sections depending on what they apply to:

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Signatures in emails sent from mobile devices

Ensuring a unified signature for the whole company is one of the top priorities for those who know the importance of branding. However, ensuring the same template for all employees may prove to be a bit tricky, regardless of the company’s size. The reason for that is the abundance of mobile devices.

Signatures in mobile devices

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How to set up email disclaimers on Exchange Server

In this article I will show you how to use Microsoft Exchange Server’s built-in transport features to stamp users’ emails with fixed-text disclaimers, notices, warnings, etc.

Email disclaimer on Exchange 2016 and 2013

  1. In Exchange admin center go to mail flow, rules.Microsoft Exchange 2016 - mail flow rules
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Active Directory data in email signatures

When deploying email signatures for multiple users from a central place, you need a way to easily include these users’ personal information like names, titles, departments, addresses, etc. in the signatures. This is achieved using placeholders integrated with a central directory that stores users’ personal details (e.g. Active Directory), and including the placeholders in signature templates.

Active Directory data in email signatures

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How to remove emoticons from your Exchange mail?

Most people think that emoticons are a necessity in everyday mail communication, whereas some purely treat them as a mean to undermine their professional credibility. And consequently, attempt to sustain their inbound mail communication in more formal style. Unfortunately, Exchange Server platform does not provide sufficient tools to filter out or replace unwanted strings of signs, and establishing new rules in mail flow does not really solve the issue. The only way through is to use a third party solution.

CodeTwo Exchange Rules Pro is a centrally managed tool that tackles email flow control on Exchange. Its main service is directly deployed on a server communication pipeline and requires only a few touches from an administrator to be configured and start working. This fully packed toolbox allows users to swiftly modify incoming and outgoing messages by simply setting up appropriate rules. Creating a rule to eliminate emoticons from your Exchange mail is a piece of cake. Just check this out:

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How to track link clicks in Exchange email signatures

If you’re an Exchange admin, the benefits of tracking link clicks in emails may not be immediately obvious to you. But trust me, your marketing guys would die to be able to do it. Why? Because it would let them measure the popularity and results of marketing campaigns ran in emails. Which is somewhere in the Top 5 of things they like to do.

How to track link clicks in Microsoft Exchange email signatures

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How to add a HTML email signature in OWA 2010

1. In the upper-right corner of your OWA page click Options, See All Options… .

OWA 2010: Options

2. On the Options page, click Settings, make sure the Mail tab is selected. Now you can start composing your own signature.

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Managing banner ads in corporate emails behind IT’s back

Marketing-ninja manages banners in email signatures without IT department's help

I recently came up with a small marketing hack, which lets the Marketing department run and switch ad campaigns in emails without the help of IT. Nothing too complicated (or ominous, as the title might suggest) – some marketers out there may already be doing it. But it saves a lot of time, resources and gives marketers a little more freedom to get creative.

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