Author Archives: Adam the 32-bit Aardvark

Email signatures on Exchange Server: Business guide

Unless you’re a time traveler from the early 1990’s, chances are emails in your Exchange organization already contain signatures.

But what do they look like? If you allowed individual users to set them up on their own, you and your company may have ended up with a mess of bigger or smaller proportions.

Let’s see what could go wrong:

An email signature deployed by the end-user

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Set Outlook Web App signature with image using PowerShell

Applies to Exchange 2016, Exchange 2013, Exchange 2010 and Exchange Online (Office 365).

In corporate environments central management of email signatures is a must – you don’t want users messing up the company’s image by sending out emails stamped with notes in Comic Sans, lacking crucial contact info, etc.

So it’s a good thing that Microsoft Exchange platforms offer several means of controlling the email footer situation in your network. The most popular one is the Apply disclaimers feature available via Exchange transport rules, which I’ve talked about extensively on this blog (see respective guides for Exchange Online, 2016, 2013, 2010 and 2007).

How to set Outlook Web App signature with image using PowerShell

Another way of deploying email signatures from one place across an Exchange organization, is using the Set-MailboxMessageConfiguration PowerShell cmdlet with the -SignatureHTML parameter.

This method allows you to populate the Email signature box in end-users’ Outlook Web App / Outlook on the Web clients with any type of HTML content: text, tables, images, links, etc.

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How to set up email disclaimers on Exchange Server

In this article I will show you how to use Microsoft Exchange Server’s built-in transport features to stamp users’ emails with fixed-text disclaimers, notices, warnings, etc.

Email disclaimer on Exchange 2016 and 2013

  1. In Exchange admin center go to mail flow, rules.Microsoft Exchange 2016 - mail flow rules
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How to create company-wide email signatures and disclaimers in Office 365

Below you will find details on what you have to do to set up your own server-level automatic email signature or disclaimer using the built-in Office 365 tool.

A little info about the tool: like most today’s email signature solutions, it supports HTML content such as tables, images and font formatting, but In contrast to e.g. Google Apps for Business, it also allows for automatic personalization of individual signatures.  Limitations include no option to insert the signature directly below the latest email reply or forward and lack of preview on the end-user’s side (learn more…).

Steps to set up an email signature policy in Office 365:

  1. Log in to the Office 365 portal using an Exchange Online administrator account and access the Microsoft 365 admin center as shown in the below image:

    Accessing the Office 365 admin center

  2. Expand Admin centers and click Exchange.

    Office 365: Accessing Exchange admin center
    Fig. 1. The Exchange option in the Microsoft 365 admin center menu.

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Active Directory data in email signatures

When deploying email signatures for multiple users from a central place, you need a way to easily include these users’ personal information like names, titles, departments, addresses, etc. in the signatures. This is achieved using placeholders integrated with a central directory that stores users’ personal details (e.g. Active Directory), and including the placeholders in signature templates.

Active Directory data in email signatures

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How to set up email signatures on Exchange Server 2016

Possibly the biggest surprise brought about by the release of Exchange 2016 is… how similar it is to Exchange 2013. In fact, in terms of email signature management it’s pretty much identical (if you’re familiar with the 2013 version of Microsoft’s email server, you’ll see what I mean). However, many of you may have never had the opportunity to poke around Exchange 2013, so let’s get to work:

NOTE: This solution comes with several limitations, which I discuss in the last section of the article.

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Email signatures for marketing / branding purposes?

A new fashion has been steadily rising around the concept of visual content in marketing and branding. We have watched it grow for the past years and now this grown up child has taken its well-deserved place in the marketers’ playground. It fits perfectly there. We’re talking about email signatures and their magnitude for marketing and branding purposes. If you don’t know the story yet, just dip into this article.

An Email signature

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How to remove emoticons from your Exchange mail?

Most people think that emoticons are a necessity in everyday mail communication, whereas some purely treat them as a mean to undermine their professional credibility. And consequently, attempt to sustain their inbound mail communication in more formal style. Unfortunately, Exchange Server platform does not provide sufficient tools to filter out or replace unwanted strings of signs, and establishing new rules in mail flow does not really solve the issue. The only way through is to use a third party solution.

CodeTwo Exchange Rules Pro is a centrally managed tool that tackles email flow control on Exchange. Its main service is directly deployed on a server communication pipeline and requires only a few touches from an administrator to be configured and start working. This fully packed toolbox allows users to swiftly modify incoming and outgoing messages by simply setting up appropriate rules. Creating a rule to eliminate emoticons from your Exchange mail is a piece of cake. Just check this out:

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How to track link clicks in Exchange email signatures

If you’re an Exchange admin, the benefits of tracking link clicks in emails may not be immediately obvious to you. But trust me, your marketing guys would die to be able to do it. Why? Because it would let them measure the popularity and results of marketing campaigns ran in emails. Which is somewhere in the Top 5 of things they like to do.

How to track link clicks in Microsoft Exchange email signatures

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